Previously I’ve discussed the power of frequency for blogs. Would the same relationship hold in the case of Twitter? What about one of the questions that the post left me with. Is there is a maximum that you could blog, tweet, pin etcetera as to not make the results decline?

Twitter Infographic - How to get more clicks on TwitterWhen looking at Twitter, does increased frequency lead to higher traffic and lead generation? When having a further look on the research by Hubspot, we are able to confirm the relationship between the amount of followers on Facebook and Twitter with respect to traffic and lead generation. Generally, the bigger your online fanbase, the more leads or traffic you will generate.

But how would I increase the amount of followers? Some very practical tips to start with are given by @danzarrella. He analyzed 200.000 link containing tweets to identify the CTR (Click-through Rate).

Number of Clicks / Number of Followers = CTR

With his data he was able to identify some characteristics of tweets that delivered the highest CTR. Remember that this is, again, no holy grail. For every type of business or situation there are other ways to behave, but take this advice as a beginners start into the realm of tweeting. Dan Zarella recommends you to pay attention to the following tweet characteristics:

  • Length - keep your tweets to 120-130 characters long
  • Location – place your link 25% of the way into your tweet
  • Language – include the words via, @, RT, please and check
  • Language – use more adverbs and verbs
  • Time - tweet on a FridaySaturday and Sunday during the afternoon

One of his conclusions that I was looking for is the frequency of ones twitter behaviour. However he has not mentioned that increased posting on Twitter will increase your followers. Instead, in his infographic (click to enlarge), he recommends you to slow down the pace of tweets since twittering over once an hour will drastically lower your CTR.

This indicates that indeed there is a frequency ceiling with respect to Twitter. But what about the positive effects of high frequency twittering?  I’ve found remarkably few recommendations on frequent twittering on online blog posts. Only this blog and the post here mention positive effects of more frequent twittering.

Would that be because on Twitter regular “tweeting” is a given, rather than a question? Does the platform require a high frequency due to the necessity of tweets being current and to-the-point? Interestingly there is something as a frequency ceiling. Would the same hold for a blog?

References:

Student Ondernemerschap en MKB management. Bsc. International Business gericht op strategie en marketing. Verliest wel zijn haren, maar leert graag nieuwe streken.

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